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Power outages continue for days in Southeastern Pa.

By Catherine Hawley, Reporter, @CatherineH_WFMZ, chawley@wfmz.com
Published On: Feb 07 2014 09:03:30 PM CST
Updated On: Feb 08 2014 04:54:51 PM CST

Three days and counting. That's how long it's been for thousands of folks without power in Doylestown.

DOYLESTOWN, Pa. -

It's been days for thousands of folks without power in Bucks, Montgomery and Chester counties. As of early Saturday evening, nearly 100,000 customers in these three counties were without power, according to PECO's website.

"We're just trying to stay warm," explained Jason Wood of Doylestown. "We're trying to stay busy during the days, keep the fire going."

But it's a battle Wood and his wife aren't winning. They're bundling up with blankets, even trying to section off parts of the house to keep the heat in.

"We can now see our breath a little bit more so we're probably somewhere between 43 and 45 degrees depending on which room in the house you're in," Wood said.

The Woods aren't alone. Power was knocked out to the entire Clemens Farm neighborhood in Doylestown Borough.

"Power went out Wednesday morning around 7 a.m.," shared Kel Bucey.

Folks say they're frustrated PECO keeps changing estimates about when the power will be restored. Some are now relying on generators.

"We have heat now so it's back up in the 60s," added Bucey. "We have lights at night and we also have the refrigerator on, but other than that there is nothing else, just got the basics."

When the ice storm hit 90 percent of the borough lost power. Crews have cut that number down, but still a third of the residents are in the dark. Local leaders say this is not the time to take any chances.

"The chief concern is just safety," Doylestown Borough Council President Det Ansinn said. "People presume they can kind of ride this out in their homes, but it is so cold that they should certainly seek out friends, family."

In nearby Doylestown Township, it's much of the same. Massive trees took out numerous power lines, coming dangerously close to houses.

"It sounded like an explosion," described Mark Ashby. "I just looked up and then I saw sparks of electrical wires flying and then the tree coming right toward our house, but the back of the tree where it snapped caught onto the wires and it flipped it back away from our house."