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Life Lessons: Ace the job interview

By Nancy Werteen, Anchor / Reporter, NWerteen@wfmz.com
Published On: Sep 23 2013 04:00:00 AM CDT

Not too many things are more nerve racking than the job interview. What exactly are employers looking for?

Not too many things are more nerve racking than the job interview.

What exactly are employers looking for? At a recent Career Fair in Allentown, employers say the job interview is just as important as you think it is.

They're trying to find out if you can do the job but also if you will bring energy, creativity and a positive attitude with you as well.

Robert Weaver, who is in human resources with the Northeast Pennsylvania Lions Eye Bank in Bethlehem says, " It's one thing what you can see on a resume but they may be something totally different in person so I want to know does it match up? Secondly, that they can communicate and they are really interested in this position."

Lisa Natosi of Allied Personnel Services adds, "My advice would be to research the company that you're going to be interviewing with. Find out smart questions to ask."

So, find out about the company and the job.

Then:

*Dress clean and neat
*Look the person in the eyes
*Sit up Straight
*Be confident in who you are and what you have to offer
*Practice with someone else. Answer questions you expect to be asked.

Nerayda Fernandez, with Berks and Beyond Employment Services says, " People do stand out and if you come in with a positive attitude and look like you want to work, you're definitely going to make a statement."

Jack Koehler, with East Penn Manufacturing, says the job interview has changed over the years.

"There are a lot of different things companies are looking for. We're looking at not only the formal questions but behavioral questions as well."

He says these questions are designed to make sure an applicant can work well with others.

The employers say to avoid some common mistakes like, "coming unprepared, coming in here sloppy, not dressed for a position," says Weaver.

Natosi says, "I would say some common mistakes are to speak poorly of your past employer. Just stick to the facts. I would also be honest about your dates of employment because most people are going to check your references and confirm the dates you worked."