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Man uses social media to find owner of lost camera

By Will Lewis, Reporter, WLewis@wfmz.com
Published On: May 16 2014 04:07:17 PM CDT
Updated On: May 16 2014 04:26:20 PM CDT

How far would you go to help reunite a stranger with a lost possession?

How far would you go to help reunite a stranger with a lost possession?

This is the story of a man on a mission to do the right thing and how social media made it happen.

Ryan Chrisman, a former golf pro, is trying to get back on a professional tour and uses his girlfriend's camera to record his swing.

Earlier this month, Chrisman and his girlfriend, Katie Kunkel, were at Southmore Golf course in Bath, Northampton County, and the camera disappeared.

"Bounced out of the cart while I was driving somehow and didn't even realize it until I got in the car," said Chrisman.

Days later, Rob Baker was on the course, and one errant shot led Baker near a drainage ditch.

"Apparently, this camera had been swept up from somewhere else in the water and had ended up there," said Baker, whose family owns Christmas City Studios, a business known for senior portraits in the Lehigh Valley.

Even though the camera was damaged, the chip with the pictures was able to be saved. Once Baker saw the photos, he knew he had to find the owner.

"Based on my connection with photos is what made me go, 'Hey, I think it's possible to get this back to them,'" said Baker. "It's important to get it back to them."

So, he posted a plea for help on Facebook.

"'Hey, help me find the family,'" said Baker. "You see enough going on on Facebook that just isn't worthwhile. This is actually the perfect application for Facebook."

The post was shared so many times it reached Katie Kunkle's uncle in Florida.

"He saw it and messaged me and said somebody on Facebook found your camera," said Kunkle.

Many of the photos were from last Christmas, and Kunkle's daughter's eighth birthday celebration at Walt Disney World, photos that were never uploaded to a computer.

"Without this memory card, we would have lost all the pictures that we had," said Chrisman.

The saying goes, "A picture is worth a thousand words."

Kunkle has only two words for the man who saved her memories -- thank you.

"It was really nice that someone cared enough to try and find us," added Kunkle.

"We may not know it, but we're all connected within two or three people," said Baker. "And that kind of became obvious with this project here."

The trio has vowed to keep in touch. The next meeting may be on a golf course.