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Shooting victims' granddaughter: They were madly, madly in love with each other

Published On: Mar 19 2013 08:27:51 PM CDT
Updated On: Mar 20 2013 04:38:45 PM CDT

Shooting victims granddaughter: They were madly, madly in love with each other

ALLENTOWN, Pa. -

Relatives of the man who killed his wife inside Lehigh Valley Hospital's hospice ward said he was overcome with sadness, after his wife suffered a debilitating stroke earlier this month.

Elwood and Mildred Osman were married for 64 years. They were inseparable, according to their family.

"They were madly, madly in love with each other," said granddaughter Sarah Kehm.

They went by "Woody" and "Mickey."

"So they were always referred to as Woody Woodpecker and Mickey Mouse," said their daughter, Linda Mullin.

Even in their 80s, they still looked like kids in love.

"They were always together," said Mullin. "Never went anywhere without each other."

That included Lehigh Valley Hospital's 17th Street campus, where Mildred Osman was staying for end-of-life hospice care.

"My mom had a stroke on March first, and it left her paralyzed on her left side," said Mullin. "She could no longer speak."

Kehm added: "She couldn't feed herself. She couldn't walk; she couldn't get up. She couldn't go to the bathroom."

Just after 1:00 Tuesday afternoon, Woody Osman walked into his wife's hospital room with a gun -- killing her, then himself, according to Lehigh Co. District Attorney Jim Martin.

Osman's family said his wife's stroke took the life out of him.

"Absolutely devastated, completely beside himself," said Kehm. "[He] had no idea what to do."

Outside the couple's Lehigh Twp., Northampton Co., home, neighbors said Osman was devastated at the thought of putting his wife in a nursing home.

"I want people to know that my dad did this strictly out of love," said Mullin. "He was a broken man."

Osman's family said he was a good man with a kind heart. He even volunteered at Union Terrace in Allentown for 13 years, reading to kids.

The couple's family said neither the hospital, nor hospice, called them after the shooting. Kehm said she heard about the incident from media reports.

"When I went on the news, I saw what had happened and what floor it had happened on, and that's how I found out," she said. "No phone calls or anything."

A hospital spokesman said Wednesday that, because it was a crime scene, LVH was legally barred from contacting the family.  Only police or the coroner could notify them.

Funeral arrangements are not set yet.