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Largest municipality in regional police force approves its portion of 2014 budget

By Len Righi, WFMZ.com Reporter
Published On: Nov 26 2013 10:03:46 PM CST
Updated On: Nov 27 2013 07:50:18 AM CST
Hanover Twp. supervisors' meeting
HANOVER TWP., Pa -

The largest contributor to a regional police department supported by three Northampton County municipalities has agreed to pay its share of the force's 2014 budget.

Hanover Township supervisors voted 5-0 Tuesday night to contribute $1,642,732 next year to the Colonial Regional Police Department budget, about $50,000, or 4 percent, more than this year.

After last night's meeting, the supervisors could not supply the exact amount of the department's 2014 budget, but estimated the total at just over $3 million.

Supervisors' chairman, John Diacogiannis, said the 2014 department budget includes money for an extra full-time officer, which will increase the force to 25 members.

Lower Nazareth Township and the borough of Bath will supply the remainder of the 2014 funding for the department. The department which was formed by the three municipalities in 1995.

In other business, the supervisors held a brief public hearing on a plan mapping out how the township will spend money on its roads in the coming years.

No one from the public attended the hearing.

James Milot of Hanover Engineering explained specifics of the proposed update of the township's Transportation Capital Improvements Plan, which calls for $3,628,739 in spending.

Milot said six intersections will be targeted for work to be done by 2017. They are: Jacksonville and Bridle Path roads; Brodhead Road and Commerce Way (west); Brodhead Road and Commerce Way (east); Stoke Park Road and Wegmans Drive; Southland and Crawford drives; and Hanoverville Road and Harriet Lane.

A proposed hike in the township's traffic impact fee, which is paid by land developers, was also part of the hearing.

The fee would rise to $343 for each peak hour traffic trip a new development would be expected to generate, Milot said.

That's about a 17 percent increase over the current rate of  $294, which was set in 2007.

Milot said the rise was driven by two factors: the inflation rate and new PennDOT standards for foundations and poles for traffic signals and curbs to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The supervisors could act on the updated capital improvements plan and higher impact fee in December.