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Digging out the day after season's biggest snowstorm

By Will Lewis, Reporter, WLewis@wfmz.com
Published On: Feb 14 2014 03:57:27 PM CST
Updated On: Feb 14 2014 04:35:11 PM CST

It's been a long day of cleanup around the region, and some people are growing weary of the post-snowstorm routine.

BETHLEHEM, Pa. -

It's been a long day of cleanup around the region, and some people are growing weary of the post-snowstorm routine.

Some braved the elements early in the morning just to walk around; others got up early to make sure everyone had a clear path.

"We worked until about 8:00 last night, and then we came back out this morning about 4:00. So, we'll work until everything is done," said Matt Cascioli, Ridgeline Roofing.

This has been a busy time for snow removal businesses, but people living on Atlantic Street in Bethlehem said they cleared a lot of snow during the break of Thursday's storm, and it makes them a little upset to wake up and see piles of plowed snow around their cars six feet high.      

"I used to live in Northampton. They would come with dump trucks and bulldozers, put it in dump trucks, take it to the park and dump it there or dump it in the river," said Daryl Hartzell, Bethlehem.

A lot of municipalities are playing catchup, as well. Centre Square in Easton was the scene of a snowball fight Thursday night. Fifteen hours later, bulldozers were the only things throwing snow.

The city is dumping its snow at Two Rivers Landing, but it's running out of room, which means that residents in other places are wondering where are they going to put the snow.

"Do something with it because if we keep getting more storms, the roads will kind of be like this wide," said Hartzell. "You might not be able to walk up it."

Some said they would spend most of the day cleaning up and just keep piling the snow in any available space.

"I don't mind it. I mean it's work," said Cascioli.

"There's no place for it to go. I mean really it might be July until it goes away this year," said Hartzell.