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Preparations being made for worst from Hurricane Sandy

By Ryan Hughes, Reporter, RHughes@wfmz.com
Published On: Oct 26 2012 02:55:53 PM CDT
Updated On: Oct 26 2012 05:48:49 PM CDT

With Hurricane Sandy threatening our area, many people are stocking up on supplies and preparing for what's to come.

With Hurricane Sandy threatening our area, many people are stocking up on supplies and preparing for what's to come.

The American Red Cross of Berks County is preparing for the worst.

"This is a dangerous, potentially extremely dangerous storm, so people need to take the steps now to be prepared," said Adrian Grieve, American Red Cross.

Shoppers in Berks County were following that advice Friday. Sandy's wrath was driving traffic into the Lowe's in Exeter Township.

"Right now, we are out of supply on generators, however, we have an emergency supply coming in," said Jason Eells.

Lowe's looked more like storm prep central with flashlights, batteries, sump pumps and an aisle fully stocked with plywood.

"I have a generator, have flashlights. I'm good to go. Don't have to worry about anything," said John Wiencek.

Across town at Redner's in Muhlenberg Township, shoppers were stocking up on the essentials.

"Meat, eggs, orange juice, milk," said Jack LaPearl.

"Getting my regular groceries plus a few extra things," said Nancy Bower.

"Extra bottled water, you know the staples," said Francine Ellis.

Redner's ordered extra cases of those staples, and the store was stocking the eggs and milk, preparing for the increased crowds.

The Red Cross urges everyone to have an emergency kit ready, have a plan and be informed.

"This is the potential big storm we may be talking about for years to come," said Grieve.

Crews around Berks County spent Friday clearing storm drains of leaves. Officials in Muhlenberg Township asked its residents not to put their leaves along the curb until Hurricane Sandy passes.

Officials at Blue Marsh Lake also started releasing water Friday to help control flooding when the storm hits. They're letting out 1,500 cubic feet of water per second to bring the lake down to 285 feet above sea level.

The release will raise the Tulpehocken Creek by about 18 inches, but officials said it's their best bet to control flooding.