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Power crews ready for possible outages during nor'easter

By Ryan Hughes, Reporter, RHughes@wfmz.com
Published On: Nov 07 2012 04:04:33 PM CST
Updated On: Nov 07 2012 04:59:09 PM CST

Just one week after Hurricane Sandy pummeled the East Coast, a nor'easter is expected to bring a bit of snow and gusty winds to the region.

MUHLENBERG TWP., Pa. -

Just one week after Hurricane Sandy pummeled the East Coast, a nor'easter is expected to bring a bit of snow and gusty winds to the region.

Power companies and road crews were in place Wednesday, prepared for what they called, "Round 2."

PennDOT trucks spent the day getting ready for the nor'easter, expected to bring the first snow flakes of the season. Crews loaded their fleet with salt. Fifty-five trucks were in place, ready to attack the roads across Berks County.

"Everyone is freezing cold already. People can't get gas. They can't get out and get food. It's scary," said Kim Martin, who lives in Berks and does not want any snow.

The nor'easter has come on the heels of Hurricane Sandy, which blew through our area last week. She caused massive power outages and sent trees on top of homes.    

Met-Ed reported more than 70,000 outages in Berks because of Hurricane Sandy. The last customer had power restored Tuesday, said officials.

Now, Berks County has prepared for another round of wind gusts, and people hope the power isn't knocked out again.

"I have food in the house, have a generator ready if the electric goes out, which I don't know if it will this time," said Hugh Grey, who spent Wednesday grocery shopping.

Med-Ed is not taking any chances. The power company had its crews on standby before the storm.

"They're all still in the area. We have a lot of outside crews that are still here with us. We're going to keep them overnight to see what the nor'easter that's forecasted for this area does," said Scott Surgeoner, a spokesman for Met-Ed.

Berks resident Paula Judson wanted the storm to avoid our area. She hopes her lights stay on and the winds don't cause any more damage.

"If we get it again, we're going to be without power again, and it's a shame. It really is," said Judson.

PennDOT started dual shifts as of noon Wednesday. Crews are working 12 hours on 12 off until the roads are cleaned up.