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Poll: Romney cuts Obama's lead in Pa.

By Dwayne Parker, Reporter, DParker@wfmz.com
Published On: Oct 16 2012 07:00:00 PM CDT
Updated On: Oct 17 2012 05:17:17 AM CDT

A new Quinnipiac University poll indicates Pennsylvania is regaining its status as a battleground state.

A new Quinnipiac University poll indicates Pennsylvania is regaining its status as a battleground state.

The poll, released Tuesday, shows President Barack Obama's lead across the state is shrinking, and Governor Romney is gaining ground.

Three weeks ago, President Obama had a 12-point lead among likely voters in Pennsylvania, according to poll numbers.

But according to the poll released Tuesday, Gov. Mitt Romney now trails the president 50 - 46 percent among Pennsylvania likely voters.

"There's been an eight-point jump in support from men for Romney," said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. "There's been a 14 percent pickup in white Catholics for Romney. There's also been a pickup in what we call blue collar workers."

Quinnipiac officials add that after the first presidential debate, the numbers for President Obama started to tumble immediately.

"The president, by his own admission, did not have a great night; Romney, by most people's account, had a very good night," Malloy said.

"I'm not surprised. I think it was the debates that probably changed everyone's mind. They wanted to see [Obama] come out a little bit stronger, and he didn't," said Jessica Morris from West Reading.

Some voters also cite how the administration has recently handled the terrorist attack in Bengahzi, Libya, as another possible reason for increasing support for Romney in the state.

"They let Hilary take the blame and the state department. I think maybe it's a leadership issue, and I think people feel that Romney may be a stronger leader," said Robert Pollack from Wyomissing.

"I think there's a lot of movement among the undecided folks. And I don't think the race is over yet," said Mary Agnew from Reading.

Quinnipiac experts add that if the poll numbers get any tighter, you can expect more television ads, from both parties, to dominate the airwaves across the state.