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New video of police chief surfaces hours after suspension

By Ryan Hughes, Reporter, RHughes@wfmz.com
Published On: Jul 31 2013 07:00:00 PM CDT
Updated On: Aug 01 2013 05:21:27 PM CDT

Four hours after he was suspended, the now famous Schuylkill County police chief was at it again.

GILBERTON, Pa. -

Four hours after he was suspended, the now famous Schuylkill County police chief was at it again.

A new video surfaced, and the Gilberton chief had some strong words for borough leadership, who he said is plotting to fire him.

Mark Kessler posted another gun-toting video on YouTube after he was handed a 30-day suspension without pay.

This time, the chief was seen firing at a Hispanic man and called him an Obama supporter. His controversial, profanity spewing videos have gone viral, and they've sparked debate.

"When he threatens the life of the secretary of state, when he threatens the life of the House minority leader, when he says that Democrats have no civil rights and then I'm going to go there and he tells all his people to come armed, that's scary," said Michael Morrill, executive director of Keystone Progress.

At Wednesday night's packed borough council meeting, Kessler was suspended for using borough property without permission. Now, the embattled chief believes borough leadership is conspiring against him, trying to get him fired.

On his website and his Facebook page, Kessler called the mayor and council members cowards and hacks. He said, "You pretend to uphold the constitution. You sicken me!"

Despite the suspension, many people have backed Kessler's comments and videos. In fact, two certificates of excellence were posted on his police cruiser at borough hall for standing up for his amendment rights.

"I don't disagree with him. We're giving away too many of our rights as it is," said Bill Griffin.

Kessler said he shot the videos to stand up for what he believes in, but now he's received death threats, and people across the country called for his resignation.

Kessler's attorney, Joseph Nahas, is reportedly reviewing the legality of the suspension. Nahas said Kessler believed he had permission to use the weapons, and his contract and state law give him certain protections as a chief of police.

Calls seeking comment from Kessler and borough officials were not immediately returned.