Allentown
32° F
Clear
Clear

ESU Middle East experts discuss Syrian conflict

By Will Lewis, Reporter, WLewis@wfmz.com
Published On: Sep 24 2013 09:02:35 PM CDT
Updated On: Sep 24 2013 10:36:34 PM CDT

ESU holds Middle East forum

EAST STROUDSBURG, Pa. -

Should the U.S. get involved in the conflict in Syria?

It's a question lawmakers have been debating.

Students at East Stroudsburg University got a chance to hear from experts on the issue.

"This is definitely a complicated issue," said Cem Zeytinoglu, associate professor of communication studies, at East Stroudsburg University.

The hope is that five professors, all with expertise can simplify the Syrian conflict for students at East Stroudsburg University.
The first order of business, establish how the war started.

"It started as a political conflict but as in the Middle East more often than not it is acquiring some sectarian damnations," said Sam Quainoo, professor of political science for the university.

The group told students that as the conflict progresses more into a war between religious groups, that more casualties will be added to the massive amount of people already affected by the civil war that began in 2011.

"It is estimated so far more than 100,000 people have lost their lives," added Quainoo. "You have more than 4 million Syrians displaced within Syria. You have more than two million that have become refugees."

The question now is if the United States should get involved.

Khomeini became a role model," said S. Hooshang Pazaki, professor of sociology. "Became basically as the recipe that they could use in how to use religion to mobilize people against their leaders."

The group told students that America has been involved in Middle Eastern conflicts since the 1950's.
But Syria presents a lot of different threats, threats like chemical warfare, drone attacks, and the possibility of a slowing American economy due to slowed oil production to Europe and China.

"America has a stake in what is going on in Syria just because our interest will be affected as well as it's a global issue," said Quainoo.