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69 News week in review

By Gina Johnson, Web Producer
Published On: Feb 16 2013 11:13:54 AM CST
Updated On: Feb 17 2013 05:34:04 PM CST

Week in Review

ALLENTOWN, Pa. -

It's time to take a look back at the stories making headlines this week in the 69 News week in review.

On Monday Pope Benedict XVI made history when he announced he would retire at the end of February.

It's the first time in 600 years a pope has made this decision.  He says it's because of his declining health.

Catholics across the world were shocked at the news.  Some hope the new pope will be a little younger and invigorate the youth of the church.

A conclave of cardinals will meet in Rome to elect a successor next month.

Pope Benedict resigns

On Tuesday, an 8th grader from Berks County who was stabbed inside Wilson Southern Middle School school spoke out.

The teen accused of stabbing him was in juvenile court and was sentenced to nine to 12 months in a secure treatment facility.

The victim says the incident haunts him.  He says it's stressful to go back inside the building where he was stabbed, and that he's never been the same as he was before the stabbing.

The defendant will have hearings every six months.

School stabbing victim shares tale of terror with 69 News

Wednesday, police in North Coventry Township, Chester County had their first homicide investigation in 40 years on their hands.

Police discovered the body of 17-year-old Kevin Allen after a fire was reported inside his father's apartment at Hanover Garden Apartments Tuesday night.

Officials say the fire was considered arson, and that the attack was not random.

Allen lived with his mother but was visiting his father.

Police said his father is not a suspect.

DA: Teens killer is sloppy, leaves behind clues

Thursday, a judge ruled against a Lehigh University student who said she received an unfair grade.

Megan Thode graduated from Lehigh in 2009 and sued over a C+ grade in one of her classes.

Thode said the grade cost her a degree and a career as a higher paying licensed therapist.

She sued the university for $1.3 million in what she called lost lifetime earnings.

The judge ruled there was no evidence Lehigh or its staff did anything wrong, saying Thode failed to present sufficient evidence that her grade was given based on anything other than the Professor's academic evaluation.

Judge rules against student who sued Lehigh University over grade

And that's your 69 News week in review.